Wimbledon should accommodate more than 25% of the crowd

Wimbledon 2021 kicks off on June 28 and could welcome a larger crowd than initially anticipated. In fact, at Chruch Road, the board of the most famous London tournament on the lawns in the world hopes to be able to host more than 25% of the crowd expected last April.

In fact, last April, the All England Club announced a maximum capacity of 25 percent for the edition that starts in late June. However, there is a very important variable to consider from here until the beginning of Wimbledon 2021: in the United Kingdom there is the phase of total re-openings after the lockdowns and closures of the past few months, however, the Indian variant of COVID-19, the impact of which is yet to be verified, would once again be jeopardizing the openings made in the UK and there is much concern about it.

Wimbledon should accommodate more than 25% of the crowd

Meanwhile, the organizers of Wimbledon, in a note published last Wednesday, then deleted, on the tournament website, said: “Following the further relaxation of the restrictions foreseen for Phase 3, and following the first positive indications of the Event Research Program, we are confident that we can increase the catchment area of ​​this edition of the Championships from the 25 percent announced last month.

This optimism is based in particular on the reintroduction of indoor catering services for groups of up to six people starting from May 17, and early indications of Phase 4 suggest that similar protocol relaxations could be used for the courts.”

In our last article about Wimbledon 2021 and the presence of the crowd, we have to recall that Championships will be a slightly different this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic but still the organizers are excited about the event. Last year, The Championships got canceled for the first time since 1945. This season, the grass season is set to return and Wimbledon is set to take place.

“I would like to say how excited we are that Wimbledon will be back this summer, with the best tennis players in the world competing on our grass courts, in front of our passionate spectators. While it will, necessarily, be different from Wimbledon as we know it, we are full of enthusiasm and totally committed to our return following last year’s cancellation,” AELTC Chairman Ian Hewitt said.

Meanwhile, Chief Executive Sally Bolton added: “We would like to thank all those with whom we continue to work across government, public health and other sporting bodies for their support to make this a reality, to bring back sporting events in the way that we all recognise.

Our priority has and will always be to do this safely, with the support and trust of all our stakeholders”.

“We very much hope 25% is a minimum position from which we can build – it is our absolute desire to enable as many people as possible to safely attend The Championships this year. At the heart of our thinking is the intention to create the mix of spectators for which Wimbledon is known, while also working hard to protect the financial performance of The Championships, including the surplus that we deliver for the benefit of British tennis,” Bolton revealed.

The last Wimbledon edition was one of the most memorable ones as world No. 1 Novak Djokovic saved two championship points in the final to beat record eight-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer.