Washington Flashback: Nick Kyrgios edges Daniil Medvedev to lift trophy

In March 2019, world no. 72 Nick Kyrgios saved three match points against Rafael Nadal in Acapulco and defeated Stan Wawrinka, John Isner and Alexander Zverev to grab the title that came out of nowhere. Nick barely won a match after that and waited for another ATP 500 event on the hard court in Washington to show his best tennis again, defeating six rivals to go all the way and collect the sixth ATP trophy. In a thrilling semi-final against Stefanos Tsitsipas, Kyrgios saved a match point in the deciding tie break to set Daniil Medvedev clash for the title. The Aussie beat an in-form Russian 7-6, 7-6 in an hour and 34 minutes, saving a set point in the first set and overcoming back pain to cross the finish line first and complete one of the favorite weeks in a career. With no tantrums and usual scenes that the crowd could see on the previous night, Nick lost 16 points on serve and never faced break chances.

Nick Kyrgios beat Daniil Medvedev in two tie breaks in Washington 2019.

Medvedev followed that pace to reach two tie breaks, firing 29 winners and 14 unforced errors and falling short against Kyrgios’ 32-19 ratio. As the numbers suggest, serve was the primary weapon on both sides, with no extended rallies or any opportunity for the returners after no deuces or prolonged action in any of 24 regular games! Only 15 exchanges passed the eight-shot mark, and Nick held a slight advantage in those, although there was nothing to separate them after winning only one point more than Daniil. In the first tie break, Medvedev had everything in his hands, leading 5-2 and creating a set point with a service winner at 5-5.

Kyrgios saved it with a winner and fired another to move 7-6 ahead before Daniil sprayed a costly error in the 14th point to hand the set to the Aussie. The second set saw nothing new, with 12 powerful holds on both sides for another tie break, a must-win one for world no. 10. At 3-4, Daniil sent a forehand long, and Nick sealed the deal with two service winners, asking someone in the crowd where to serve at 6-4 and blasting an ace to finish the job and leave Washington with a trophy in his hands.