Rafael Nadal: ‘I am convinced that those who arrive will…’

Rafael Nadal has already resumed training after a small tear in the abs forced him to give up the Wimbledon semi-final. Despite this setback and the end of the dream called ‘Calendar Grand Slam’, the Spaniard’s 2022 remains nothing short of exceptional. The former world number 1 won the Australian Open and Roland Garros, reaffirming that he is an absolute legend of modern sport. The 36-year-old from Manacor has hoisted himself to 22 Majors, stretching over Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the all-time ranking. The Serbian has shortened the gap by triumphing at Wimbledon for the seventh time in his career, but is unlikely to fly to the United States to compete in the US Open. Rafa will therefore have a great chance in New York, where he has not played since 2019. Before going to the Big Apple for the last Grand Slam of the season, the Iberian will make a stop in Canada to play the Masters 1000 in Montreal. In a recent interview with ‘Talento aboard’, the Majorcan talked about the future of tennis once the Big 3 have retired.

Rafa Nadal on the Big 3

“In tennis there has always been generational change. We have had great stars that have been replaced by others, it is normal. Perhaps in our case what has happened is that we have been many years, but I am convinced that those who arrive will stay and take over,” Rafael Nadal said. The former World No. 1 touched on the topic as well, speaking about the importance of training one’s mental strength through competition. “Mental strength is one of the important elements for competition. Everything can be trained and that mental strength is something I also worked with my uncle Toni since I was a child. Then, with the evolution of my career that work continued and the competition itself made it intensify and continue to evolve,” Nadal said. The year 2008 was a special one for Rafael Nadal. Fresh from winning his fourth consecutive French Open title, Nadal had made it to the finals of the Wimbledon Championships. Talking about that match, Nadal, in his book, Rafa: My Story, said, “Roger won the toss. He chose to serve. I didn’t mind. I like my rival to start serving at the beginning of a match. If my head is strong, if his nerves are getting to him, I know I have a good chance of breaking him. I thrive on the pressure. I don’t buckle, I grow stronger on it. The closer to the precipice I am, the more elated I feel.”