‘Rafael Nadal creates uncertainty’, says former ATP star

Shortly after Rafael Nadal won his 14th Roland Garros title, three-time Grand Slam winner Horia Tecau will play the last match of his career in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, during the sport’s annual festival on June 10. The exhibition match is intended to celebrate his tennis achievements and make the public see his tennis skills once again. Horia Tecau will be accompanied by his compatriots Simona Halep (alongside her coach Patrick Mouratoglou) and former world number 13 Andrei Pavel. “Are you ready? Let’s team up and get back on the pitch! This time not for trophies or medals, but for us and for you. See you in June at the Festival of Sport, in Cluj-Napoca. Together we will celebrate our passion for tennis,” said Simona Halep. Also in attendance will be Horia’s former doubles partner Robert Lindstedt and mixed doubles partner Bethanie Mattek-Sands. “June 10 will be a special day for Cluj, Romania, because then we will celebrate Horia Tecău at the Sports Festival. I think we should all be present, that’s why I will also participate. See you there,” said Robert Lindstedt. Unfortunately, none of the players with whom Horia Tecau won his Grand Slams titles (Wimbledon, US Open and Australian Open) will take part in the demo match. Sports Festival is the largest multi-sport event in Romania and the place where sports legends sit close to tomorrow’s champions and today’s fans, reads the description of the event.

Wilander reflects on Nadal

Former World No. 1 Mats Wilander has praised Rafael Nadal for the changes he has made to his game over the years. “His tennis is much more entertaining than Djokovic’s and Federer’s. The older he is, the more I enjoy watching him play. We see that he trusts his variations more than when he used to at 22 or 23 years old,” Wilander said. Wilander, who covered the French Open with Eurosport as a commentator, was so overwhelmed with the 36-year-old’s game that he expressed his wish to stop commentating and just watch the Spaniard play. “Previously, there was a repetitive aspect to his game. We knew exactly how he was going to win most of the points and get the job done 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Now he creates uncertainty. What will he do next? It’s like watching Federer when he was at his best. I no longer want to commentate on his matches, I just want to watch him play,” Wilander said.