Novak Djokovic: ‘It was kind of a half-joke on the court’

Novak Djokovic continues to add reasons to consider himself as the GOAT. Beyond the fact that his ambition is based exclusively on adding the most Grand Slam titles (he has 19 and is one of the 20 of Federer and Nadal), he also seeks to influence other statistics. With his triumph over Kudla, the Serbian became the first player to win at least 75 matches in each Grand Slam (82 in Australia, 81 at Roland Garros and 75 at Wimbledon and the US Open).

Djokovic didn’t receive a lot of support from the Wimbledon crowd 

Novak Djokovic didn’t receive a lot of support from the Wimbledon crowd during his third-round victory over Denis Kudla. The spectators occasionally jeered Djokovic and cheered raucously for the American underdog, and at the end of the match the Serb let out a loud yell in the direction of the stands. “My reactions were explosive, perhaps more explosive than they should be, but I had to get it out of my system and put them in their place,” Djokovic said. “Look, to be honest, it is not something that the people do not see,” Djokovic said. “It is a fact that I play 90 percent of my matches, if not even more than that, against the opponent, but against the stadium as well.” In that context, Djokovic conceded that there were very few places where he has received more support compared to his opponents. “Places where I get more support than my opponent are rare,” he said. “It is something that I am used to, but on the other hand, I am a human being with emotions, so it is normal that sometimes it gets to me and annoys me when someone provokes me. I like to think about wolves as my kind of spiritual nature guide,” Djokovic said. “I really do because I’ve seen some wolves when I was a kid, kind of roaming in the forest in the mountains where I grew up, and that encounter kind of left me frightened and then at the same time even more connected with wolves, and I feel that the connection has carried on throughout my life.” Novak Djokovic then claimed he was only half-kidding with his “wolf” remark, before reiterating how he could relate to their energy because he grew up with them. “It was kind of a half-joke on the court, so to speak,” the Serb said. “There is the connection, and I personally feel it, there is that energy of wolves and mountains and everything that I grew up with and the circumstances that I was in when I was a kid – I carry that with me, and that helps me find that energy when I need it.”