Andy Murray aims to win gold medal at Tokyo Olympics

Three-time Grand Slam champion Andy Murray is hoping to make a deep run at the Tokyo Olympics and potentially win his third gold medal. 

In 2016, Murray became the first player ever to win back-to-back gold medals, having won the 2012 London Olympics and 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. 

“On a personal level, the Tokyo Games are significant,” Murray said in a contribution post for the Olympics website. “My goal is to try and win a medal. Ideally a gold one for my country. I know first-hand the impact that playing sport for a career has on your body. I know how difficult and frustrating that journey can be. I know the heartbreak of missing a major tournament and the journey of recovery. There are many athletes for whom 2020 should have been a crowning achievement, who will now not even make the rescheduled Games this summer. I truly feel for them. It’s no secret how much the fans’ support means to me and I have great sympathy for the crowds who won’t be able to be there in person.”

Murray underlines the importance of sport during difficult times

“Exposure to sport at the highest level brings benefits we can’t begin to quantify. It supports mental health. It encourages increased physical activity. It exposes us to other cultures and peoples. It brings us together. Sport isn’t just a fundamental human right – it is one of the most impactful tools to heal and strengthen our society.

“In times of difficulty, sport isn’t just necessary, it is vital. Excellence, respect and friendship and valuing the small wins in everyday life as well as the big ones became more important than ever over the last 18 months. During the darkest days of lockdown, the workouts at home, the games of tennis played on rooftops and even the walks around the garden, gave us all a sense of hope and for many a new perspective.

“An incredible amount of work has gone into ensuring the safety of everyone involved with the Games. It’s going to be amazing to be playing in Tokyo and my own experiences are why I think the Games have never been more relevant.”